Supporting sustainable design, virtually

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au-raic-logoThe RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University, is launching its first-of-its-kind technological collaboration to promote energy-efficient building design through its online global partnerships.

This innovative, three-part workshop series, powered by the teleconferencing and video-conferencing facilities of Athabasca University, will enable students and faculty from four international post-secondary institutions to connect, in real time, to showcase the energy-efficient performance of their designs.

Additionally, it will demonstrate creative best practices of an international architectural community to share information and resources around sustainable design.

What: Sustainable Building Science: Virtual Studio Workshops — using state-of-the-art, Canadian-developed, MATCHBOX™ Energy software.

Where: Connecting students and faculty members, virtually, from around the world — from Athabasca to South Africa.

When: Tuesday, Sept. 27; Monday, October 24; Thursday, November 17

“As the host institution of this critical workshop, AU is proud to be a technological leader in connecting students from around the world to discuss sustainable building science,” says the centre’s chair, Douglas MacLeod.

“Not only are we connecting people from four participating institutions, including our own, but some of the participating students will be attending the workshops from as far away as Dar es Salaam, Tanzania — it’s very exciting.”

matchboxlogoUsing Canadian-developed MATCHBOX Energy software, the RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University (AU) is cementing its spot at the forefront of virtual design studio capability, globally.

The partnering post-secondary institutions in this pilot project — from Mexico and South Africa, to the United Kingdom and Canada — aim to demonstrate creativity and leadership in showcasing how architectural organizations can dramatically reduce their energy consumption and emissions with respect to their designs.

“We know that buildings are a major contributing factor to carbon emissions causing climate change,” says Trevor Butler, director MATCHBOX Energy.

“In that context, it is fundamental that the architects and engineers designing the built environment are capable of effectively and quickly anticipating the energy consequences of their decisions at all stages of the design process. The purpose of the MATCHBOX project is to give them that capability.”

“Not only are we connecting people from four participating institutions, including our own, but some of the participating students will be attending the workshops from as far away as Dar es Salaam, Tanzania — it’s very exciting.” ~ Douglas MacLeod, chair, RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University

cardiff-logoThe three international post-secondary institutions working with the RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University are: Mexico’s Tecnológico de Monterrey; The Cardiff School of Art & Design in Wales;and the University of the Witwatersrand’s Department of Architecture and Planning, Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, in Johannesburg, South Africa.technologico-de-monterrey

For more information on how to join in the virtual workshop series contact:

Douglas MacLeod
Chair, RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University
Web: http://architecture.athabascau.ca/
Email: dmacleod@athabascau.ca
Telephone: 250 766 3575 or 1 855 212 1747 (Toll Free)

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