Royal Architectural Institute of Canada honors two of AU’s own

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The 2016 Governor General's Medal (recipients) in Architecture (for outstanding buildings across Canada) [photo credit: RAIC 2016]

The 2016 Governor General’s Medal (recipients) in Architecture (for outstanding buildings across Canada) [photo credit: RAIC 2016]

Dr. Lisa Carter (l), Douglas MacLeod (ctr), and Carole Mason (r), at 2016 RAIC Festival of Architecture held June 10 at the Vancouver Conference Centre in Nanaimo, B.C. Both Carter and Mason received Honorary Membership in the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC).

Dr. Lisa Carter (l), Douglas MacLeod (ctr), and Carole Mason (r), at the 2016 RAIC Festival of Architecture, held June 10 at the Vancouver Conference Centre in Nanaimo, B.C. Both Carter and Mason received Honorary Membership in the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC).

On Friday, June 10, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) presented Honorary Memberships to Lisa Carter, dean of AU’s Faculty of Science and Technology, and to Program Administrator Carole Mason.

The prestigious awards were presented to the pair at the 2016 RAIC Festival of Architecture by the Ottawa-based, RAIC President Allan Teremura.

Held at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre in Nanaimo, B.C.,  the awards were created more than a century ago, with the intention to “promote architectural appreciation and the interchange of knowledge pertaining to the practice of architecture, and to encourage and recognize worthy aspirants to the profession.”

Homegrown design

Both Dr. Carter and Carole Mason have made significant contributions to the profession of architecture by virtue of their respective work and dedication managing and representing the RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University.

“The patience and diplomacy that Dean Carter and Carole Mason brought to the RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University were absolutely essential to its creation,” says Dr. Douglas MacLeod, chair of the Centre.

“Lisa worked tirelessly with all levels of the university and government to overcome obstacles, prepare innumerable submission documents, and meet with many different committees.

“She has also been instrumental in helping to raise funds for the Centre,” adds MacLeod, noting Carter’s career devotion to the development of the Centre for Architecture over an eight-year period – “a tremendous service to the profession of architecture, the university and the RAIC.”

Allan Teramura, president of the Royal Architectural institute of Canada presents AU's Dr. Lisa Carter and Carole Mason with Honorary Memberships into the Ottawa-based organization.

Allan Teramura, president of the Royal Architectural institute of Canada presents AU’s Dr. Lisa Carter and Carole Mason with Honorary Memberships into the Ottawa-based organization.

On learning she received the award, Carter says the moment was an “unexpected and very humbling experience.”

“I’m so honored to be recognized – both Carole and I – by the RAIC,” Carter remarks.

“It’s been a long journey for the both of us in getting the program at AU developed, and working with some absolutely wonderful people in the RAIC. I’m just absolutely delighted.”

The patience and diplomacy that Dean Carter and Carole Mason brought to the RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University were absolutely essential to its creation,” ~ Dr. Douglas MacLeod, chair, RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University

For her part, Carole Mason concurs that learning about her award receipt was “certainly a surprise and a shock.”

“I’m humbled and flattered. It’s exciting!” Mason says.

“Lisa Carter hired me to put these courses online and to do my best to ensure that the students had everything that they needed.

“And, as far as tutoring [goes], we did a lot of hiring to make sure that we had the most qualified teachers to teach the architecture courses at a distance. So I feel as though I was doing my job – and it was amazing to be recognized for that.”

AU Academic Research Centre2

The Academic Research Centre, Athabasca University [photo credit: MANASC ISAAC Architects, Edmonton]

The RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University

Demand for Canada’s first online post-secondary architectural program has increased 55 per cent in the past year. The RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University, is Canada’s first online post-secondary architectural centre – a virtual hotbed of creativity – offering online courses toward RAIC’s Diploma in Architecture as an alternative path to becoming a licensed architect and a direct path to allied professions.

The completed RAIC Syllabus Diploma is the Canadian equivalent of a professional university degree in architecture. Offered in partnership with the Ottawa-based Royal Architectural institute of Canada and Architecture Canada (RAIC), the Syllabus program lets students unleash their inner architects — from creating artists’ cooperatives in Calgary to designing modest-sized reading rooms.

“The RAIC helped students obtain their professional diploma in architecture by including Athabasca University courses into their curriculum,” notes Mason.

This year, AU and RAIC will be jointly promoting the fact that Syllabus students may obtain their professional certification through the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB) at the same time as working towards the Bachelor of Science Architecture program. In addition, Syllabus students may also use their course work to fill program requirements within the Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Architecture (PBDA).

“So basically we put a large number of their courses online and enabled students to take these courses from anywhere in the world.”

Demand for Canada’s first online post-secondary architectural program has increased 55 per cent in the past year.”

Mason says she’s always enjoyed working with and for the architecture students at AU. She notes another significant program stride was with respect to its “terrific” course production team within the Faculty of Science and Technology, and the assistance it provided with course editing and uploading into AU’s Moodle online program.

“This was a large amount of work and I specifically want to thank this amazing team for their never-ending support,” Mason remarks, adding she completed her own Bachelor of Science degree at AU and thereby understands the importance of online learning.

“I actually lived in Boyle, Alberta, for a number of years, and that’s when I started taking AU’s courses online. I realized how valuable it is – the importance that Athabasca University represents for students worldwide is amazing.”

Offered in partnership with the Ottawa-based Royal Architectural institute of Canada and Architecture Canada (RAIC), the PBDA program lets students unleash their inner architects—from creating artists’ cooperatives in Calgary to designing modest-sized reading rooms.”

Mason explains AU’s architecture students are accomplishing their dreams of becoming architects without attending a traditional university and completing a master’s program.

“This is their option of becoming an architect while they work,” she says, noting that AU students in the Syllabus program have to, at a certain point, be working for a licensed architect, and accumulate internship hours.

The RAIC Centre for Architecture at Athabasca University officially opened in 2011, when it began offering students online open courses to enable them to  get started on coursework within the Syllabus program. The Bachelor of Science Architecture program was approved by the Alberta government in 2014.

Says Mason: “[Since] starting the partnership, it’s come a long way – it’s fantastic for our students. It’s nice that they can see that [AU] is working so closely with the RAIC now.”

AU now offers 19 courses toward the RAIC Syllabus Diploma. For further information about the Syllabus diploma visit: http://www.raic-syllabus.ca/curriculum-sequence-chart

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