The Hub Upcoming Events

Metis Identity

Date and Time:
September 23, 2021 2:00 pm - September 23, 2021 4:00 pm
Location:
Online
Description:

Metis Identity: Join in conversation with Dr. Maria Campbell and Tony Belcourt about Metis identity, relations, and language

HOSTED BY: Athabasca University and X University
PANELISTS: Maria Campbell and Tony Belcourt, O.C., LL.D.
MODERATED BY: Lynn Lavallee, Professor and Strategic Lead Indigenous Resurgence, Faculty of Community Services, X University

Maria Campbell

Métis author, playwright, teacher, and Elder in Residence Maria Campbell is a lifelong advocate and contributor to Indigenous community, art, and politics.

Campbell was born in 1940 in northwestern Saskatchewan on a trapline and grew up in a road-allowance community. The oldest of eight children the young Maria had to leave her one-room country school to care for the other children when her mother died. At fifteen she left home and went to Vancouver. In her twenties, she returned to the Prairies and became a community worker and organizer. She was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2008.

Out of her city experience and with the help of a group she wrote Many Laws (1969), a handbook explaining the laws and problems that confront First Nations people who move to the cities.

Campbell overcame many difficulties to take control of her own life and to help her people. She is best known for her important memoir, Half-breed (1973), a journey of self-discovery and a moving account of a woman who struggled with poverty, alcoholism, drug addiction, sexual abuse, and prostitution to reach thirty-three years of age and begin her healing process. Campbell tells her story in the context of Métis culture and a forgotten history. She brings in myth and creates a distinctive voice for a people ignored by mainstream society. The book is credited with initiating a rebirth of Aboriginal literature in Canada and has been used as a text in countless university and college courses across North America and translated in Europe.

Maria Campbell went on to write three books for children: People of the Buffalo (1975), Little Badger and the Fire Spirit (1977), Riel’s People (1978) which capture aspects of Métis history. In Stories of the Road-Allowance People (1995), Campbell translated the narratives from the Cree-Mitchif language spoken by the Métis into oral English. She has used theatre to bring her Métis voice to large Canadian audiences. Her play Flight was the first all Aboriginal theatre production and included storytelling, drama, modern dance with Aboriginal arts. She wrote the play, Jessica in collaboration with Linda Griffiths. The play follows the story of a young Métis woman from innocence to despair and finally to self-realization. It debuted in 1986 at Toronto’s Theatre Passe Muraille and won the Dora Mavor Moore Award. At the Quinzanne International Festival in Quebec City, it won Best Canadian Production. Campbell and Griffiths published the play in The book of Jessica: A Theatrical Transformation (1989), which also includes the story of its collaborative creation. Campbell’s script The Red Dress (1977) is a film for the National Film Board. Between 1985 and 1997 she produced thirty-four community film documentaries and a weekly Aboriginal TV series, My Partner, My People.

Maria Campbell earned an M.A. in Native Studies from the University of Saskatchewan. She has received honorary doctorates from the University of Regina (1995), York University (1992), and Athabasca University (2000). She has taught Métis history and the study of oral traditions at universities in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Alberta. She is the Elder in Residence and a visiting academic and researcher at the Nukskahtowin, Athabasca University.

Tony Belcourt, O.C., LL.D. (Hon.)

Born in the historic Métis community of Lac Ste. Anne, Alberta, Tony Belcourt’s career spans over 50 years of experience and significant achievement in Indigenous affairs, corporate, government, and not-for-profit sectors. During this period, he founded, led, and served on the boards of numerous local, regional, national, and international Indigenous organizations including as Vice-President and Managing Director of Team Products, Alberta and Mackenzie, a cooperative of 500 Indigenous artists and craftspeople in those regions (1968-1970) and Vice-President, Metis Association of Alberta (1970-1971). As founding President of the Native Council of Canada (1971-1974), he was instrumental in creating a national voice for Canada’s Métis and Non-Status Indians and his efforts were an important contributing factor in the Métis being recognized in the Constitution Act, 1982, as one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada.

Tony is a well-respected negotiator and as founding President of the Métis Nation of Ontario (1994-2008), he helped to achieve recognition of existing Métis Constitutional rights in the 2003 Supreme Court decision in R v. Powley. He was a member of the Board of Governors of the Métis National Council (1994-2008), Métis National Council Minister for International Issues, and Métis Nation Ambassador for International Issues.

He participated in numerous meetings and conferences of the United Nations and the Organization of American States, including the negotiations on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. A champion of access to, and the appropriate use of, ICT’s by Indigenous people, he was founding President of the Indigenous Commission for Communications Technologies in the Americas (2005- 2010).

Tony Belcourt is a long-standing member of the Aboriginal Education Council at OCAD University. He received the National Aboriginal Achievement Award for Public Service in 2006; received an Honorary Doctor of Laws from Lakehead University in 2010, and was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada (2013). He has been carried by the Pipe since 2004. Now widely regarded as a Métis elder, Tony Belcourt is often invited to present on Indigenous culture, history, and traditions.

Add to Calendar September 23, 2021 2:00 pm September 23, 2021 4:00 pm MT Metis Identity

Metis Identity: Join in conversation with Dr. Maria Campbell and Tony Belcourt about Metis identity, relations, and language

HOSTED BY: Athabasca University and X University
PANELISTS: Maria Campbell and Tony Belcourt, O.C., LL.D.
MODERATED BY: Lynn Lavallee, Professor and Strategic Lead Indigenous Resurgence, Faculty of Community Services, X University

Maria Campbell

Métis author, playwright, teacher, and Elder in Residence Maria Campbell is a lifelong advocate and contributor to Indigenous community, art, and politics.

Campbell was born in 1940 in northwestern Saskatchewan on a trapline and grew up in a road-allowance community. The oldest of eight children the young Maria had to leave her one-room country school to care for the other children when her mother died. At fifteen she left home and went to Vancouver. In her twenties, she returned to the Prairies and became a community worker and organizer. She was made an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2008.

Out of her city experience and with the help of a group she wrote Many Laws (1969), a handbook explaining the laws and problems that confront First Nations people who move to the cities.

Campbell overcame many difficulties to take control of her own life and to help her people. She is best known for her important memoir, Half-breed (1973), a journey of self-discovery and a moving account of a woman who struggled with poverty, alcoholism, drug addiction, sexual abuse, and prostitution to reach thirty-three years of age and begin her healing process. Campbell tells her story in the context of Métis culture and a forgotten history. She brings in myth and creates a distinctive voice for a people ignored by mainstream society. The book is credited with initiating a rebirth of Aboriginal literature in Canada and has been used as a text in countless university and college courses across North America and translated in Europe.

Maria Campbell went on to write three books for children: People of the Buffalo (1975), Little Badger and the Fire Spirit (1977), Riel’s People (1978) which capture aspects of Métis history. In Stories of the Road-Allowance People (1995), Campbell translated the narratives from the Cree-Mitchif language spoken by the Métis into oral English. She has used theatre to bring her Métis voice to large Canadian audiences. Her play Flight was the first all Aboriginal theatre production and included storytelling, drama, modern dance with Aboriginal arts. She wrote the play, Jessica in collaboration with Linda Griffiths. The play follows the story of a young Métis woman from innocence to despair and finally to self-realization. It debuted in 1986 at Toronto’s Theatre Passe Muraille and won the Dora Mavor Moore Award. At the Quinzanne International Festival in Quebec City, it won Best Canadian Production. Campbell and Griffiths published the play in The book of Jessica: A Theatrical Transformation (1989), which also includes the story of its collaborative creation. Campbell’s script The Red Dress (1977) is a film for the National Film Board. Between 1985 and 1997 she produced thirty-four community film documentaries and a weekly Aboriginal TV series, My Partner, My People.

Maria Campbell earned an M.A. in Native Studies from the University of Saskatchewan. She has received honorary doctorates from the University of Regina (1995), York University (1992), and Athabasca University (2000). She has taught Métis history and the study of oral traditions at universities in Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Alberta. She is the Elder in Residence and a visiting academic and researcher at the Nukskahtowin, Athabasca University.

Tony Belcourt, O.C., LL.D. (Hon.)

Born in the historic Métis community of Lac Ste. Anne, Alberta, Tony Belcourt’s career spans over 50 years of experience and significant achievement in Indigenous affairs, corporate, government, and not-for-profit sectors. During this period, he founded, led, and served on the boards of numerous local, regional, national, and international Indigenous organizations including as Vice-President and Managing Director of Team Products, Alberta and Mackenzie, a cooperative of 500 Indigenous artists and craftspeople in those regions (1968-1970) and Vice-President, Metis Association of Alberta (1970-1971). As founding President of the Native Council of Canada (1971-1974), he was instrumental in creating a national voice for Canada’s Métis and Non-Status Indians and his efforts were an important contributing factor in the Métis being recognized in the Constitution Act, 1982, as one of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada.

Tony is a well-respected negotiator and as founding President of the Métis Nation of Ontario (1994-2008), he helped to achieve recognition of existing Métis Constitutional rights in the 2003 Supreme Court decision in R v. Powley. He was a member of the Board of Governors of the Métis National Council (1994-2008), Métis National Council Minister for International Issues, and Métis Nation Ambassador for International Issues.

He participated in numerous meetings and conferences of the United Nations and the Organization of American States, including the negotiations on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. A champion of access to, and the appropriate use of, ICT’s by Indigenous people, he was founding President of the Indigenous Commission for Communications Technologies in the Americas (2005- 2010).

Tony Belcourt is a long-standing member of the Aboriginal Education Council at OCAD University. He received the National Aboriginal Achievement Award for Public Service in 2006; received an Honorary Doctor of Laws from Lakehead University in 2010, and was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada (2013). He has been carried by the Pipe since 2004. Now widely regarded as a Métis elder, Tony Belcourt is often invited to present on Indigenous culture, history, and traditions.

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